fredag 25 maj 2012

Finull and Finnwool

I bought some gorgeous wool from Estonia. It's Finull from Ulles awesome sheep (see here: Vana-Olevi). Notice "gorgeous" and "awesome"? :) I don't know how to describe the wool otherwise. Look:

White, brown and black Finull, and on top of it an Ouessant sample

A closer look at the scoured brown wool:


And the raw black wool with the incredible crimp:


I have been thinking I won't scour the white wool, but will wash a sample and see how it behaves. I have never seen so clean wool before. It's winter wool! It should be felted and foul, but it's open and airy, a joy to kindly pat. It would be a shame to make it felt by washing it.

I'll start working with these wools next week. I have a few more orange Finnwool batts to card. This particular Finnwool is also of a gorgeous quality, but I'm not allowed to tell where I got it. It's rare nowadays. This is the wool I dyed some weeks ago and showed here: acid dyed Finnwool drying.


I have a plan. I'll spin the Finull and the Finnwool into yarns I can use together in a sweater. Please be patient with me, it'll take some time.

Finull and Finnwool? Yes, two different breeds from two different countries. Finull is a Swedish sheep with fine wool (that's what the name says, Fine Wool, Finull). Finnwool comes from my countries national breed, Finnsheep. The wool is fine and lustrous.

I find it very typical for our times to spin Swedish wool from Estonia in Finland. I love the thought of it.

I have finished a yarn, even if most of my time is spent on silk. I have a long time project going, ready to show next summer if all goes as planned. But here's the bobbins' ends wool yarn I plied earlier this week:


I had to empty my storage bobbins because there was no empty ones any more so I plied some of them into a 3-ply. That's why the yarn is so uneven. There are thin threads with much twist and thicker ones with less twist, spun on both spinning wheel and spindle. It'll be a nice purse.